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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. [ sniffles ] ♪ >> harris: breaking news now on the fox report and the pentagon confirming to fox news that retired general norman schwarzkopf has died. he commanded the coalition that pushed saddam hussein's forces out of kuwait in 1991. bob scales on the phone with us now. general scales you wrote a book called certain victory and you have a lot of knowledge of the history of the iraq war but personal knowledge with this man. you call him truly the first great american hero after vietnam. your thoughts? >> that is exactly right, harris. remember, i come from the same generation as general schwarzkopf and the vector was the vindication of my generation report vietnam generation because it was our first great military victory after defeat in vietnam and he took that personally. i knew general schwarzkopf well, going back to his time as a major in the pentagon. he also carried in his sack this rock that had the sigma that went with the defeat in vietnam. when defeated the iraqi military in the plains of iraq, when was able to do that one of the first things he said at the truce tent was
and they will be steep. of the $1.2 trillion in total spending cuts over nine years, $492 billion come from the pentagon. defense analysts say the impact on the military would be serious. >> the pentagon and the department are already in financial trouble. because there has already been $480 billion cut. to take another cut is devastating. >> it will make it channeling for the military to maintain the troops. equipment and preparedness. the larger defense industry also will be hit. >> severe budget cuts could put the natural security at risk if the company that make the f-35 fighter or artillery pieces don't have the money to keep going. >> my district would be adversely affected and defense spending cut by $8 billion. >> how did we get to this place? >> in budget battle, the 2011 spending cut put in as unthinkable trigger to force the lawmakers to find a way to cut spending. so far, they haven't found a way here we are. >> to make it unpalatable, they insist it comes out of the defense budget. conservatives think is much, much, much too har. >> defense secretary leon panetta said the pentagon has been
the decision to invade iraq in 2003, but later, criticized the pentagon's war planning. mostly, though, schwarzkopf devoted his time to serving as a board member and spokesman for charitable causes, living quietly in tampa, florida, where he died yesterday at the age of 78. in a statement, the first president bush, now ailing himself, called his gulf war commander "a true american patriot and one of the great military leaders of his generation." for more on general schwarzkopf and his legacy, we are joined by "new york times" reporter michael gordon. he co-authored the book, "the generals' war: the inside story of the conflict in the gulf." michael, welcome. take us back first of all to the gulf war more than two decades ago. what was it about general schwarzkopf and what he did is that made him be regarded at least by many as a hero. >> well, this is the time in which the american military did not have the confidence of the american public the way it does now. whatever people think of the wars in afghanistan or iraq, they generally believe that the military has done its part. and that
. they seem desperate to do that. plenty of liberals say, go over the cliff. big cuts in the pentagon and big tax hikes. the white house, from all indications that i've seen, they don't want that to happen. they are scared of what could happen to the markets. >> why aren't they dalg dealing with boehner? dana, be go ahead. jumpb in here. >> i think they won their negotiating power once boehner last week failed. as dana pushed out, the only thing that can get boehner is to do something. >> reporter: i think that you're right when i said that democrats don't think that the president will have much political damage. that does seem to be coming more from democrats here in congress than in the white house. democrats here in congress feel that it's a win-win for them politically. the one thing i will tell you very quickly, the pushback on this narrative that i heard from senate republican leader in the hallway. he said, do you remember who the speaker was during the hoover administration? i said, no. he said, that's my point. nobody will remember who the speaker was if ge into a recession but it's
pentagon budget issues coming up. so there's some talk about him wanting to hang on and try to manage the budget issues that are going to hit the pentagon over the next few months. host: we're taking your calls with david jackson, the white house reporter for u.s.a. today. first up is doug from oklahoma on the democratic line. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a question about geithner. hadn't he said something earlier about wanting to leave? guest: that's correct. host: around the inauguration was the quote. host: how would you feel about geithner leaving? do you want him to go as a democrat? caller: that's a good question. no. no. guest: the caller is right. geithner has said publicly he wants to leave around the nomination. but with the uncertainty, i don't think the administration would want him to leave as long as these issues are hanging. so we get a fiscal cliff this deal and i think he's going to be gone by the end of the month but i think it's kind of up t in the air. host: says a contender for his job would be jack lew. guest: that's the betting money. is his job if
in and the pentagon will be forced to cut $9 million in spending. >> if lawmakers can't avoid the fiscal cliff, they may be able to avoid a different cliff, the dairy cliff. house and senate members appear likely to extend farm legislation for a year, a deal that would keep milk prices skyrocketing in january. we were worried about $6 gallon of milk. it could keep a decades old subsidy from coming back to life. the usda would be forced to buy milk at prices well above what farmers were getting now if the subsidy was revived. it could double the price of moib to $6.12 a gallon. >> markets have been reacting to each move on capitol hill, but obviously, things at this point are looking like the dow would open down by about 7.5 points. the dow is off 67 points and the nasdaq is down 14.75 points. all the surprised given the late hour that -- >> even if something doesn't happen today, it happens in two or three days. >> right. so if you were looking for a market reaction because a lot of the market iraqis we've heard has said, if highways the case, near not getting it base odd what they're going to
who are very upset with the cuts that would hit the pentagon. it may be difficult to rally republican votes of the cannot turn off the sequester. on the democratic side, the estate tax could be a problem. the republicans are insistent that the estate tax stay at current levels, which is exempting the state of $55 million at a relatively late 35% above that level. many democrats would like to see -- in january it is expected to come -- taxes are expected to go up dramatically. as small as $1 million would be taxed. most democrats want to see something in the metal. they are adamant that we cannot exempt states as large as $5 million. that could be another sticking point. >> do we expect anything going on today? if not, what is the earliest of the senators will come back in for session tomorrow? caller: i think the senate is due back in at 1:00. the house is due at 6:30. the house is the big question mark here. it is very difficult to imagine what could pass the house. as for today, that is an excellent question. the senate is not in here the house is not an. my understanding as we are
-the-board spending cuts set to start striking the pentagon and domestic agencies this week. so what do you think about the sequester? does it just kind of -- i don't want to use this phrase, but kick the can down the road? want after two months? >> we probably do this again. i'm not really sure why it's there. i'm not -- i don't understand who it's there to keep happy, who asked for the sequester delay. if it was the democrats, that's one thing, if it was the republicans, that's another. the house had a good plan to replace those sequester cuts with other, better cuts. so the sequester's going to be a big problem over here for those of us who are interested in reducing spending. heather: so i want to talk about whether this will, in fact, come up in the house today when they convene, i think it is noon unless that's changed. the house has informally operated under the hastert rule. basically, house gopers similarly will -- simply will not bring up a bill that does not have the majority party in the favor. even if it could pass with a colegislation of some of the members -- coalition of some of t
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)